Co-related Difficulties


R.E.A.Dyslexics, the first institute of its kind in Pakistan, caters specially to the needs of dyslexic children with learning difficulties.

Dysgraphia means difficulty with handwriting. There are several different kinds of dysgraphia. Some people with dysgraphia have handwriting that is often illegible and shows irregular and inconsistent letter formations. Others write legibly, but very slowly and/or very small. When these individuals revert to printing, as they often do, their writing is often a random mixture of upper and lowercase letters. In all cases of dysgraphia, writing requires inordinate amounts of energy, stamina, and time.

Dysgraphia can interfere with a student’s ability to express ideas. Expressive writing requires a student’s ability to express ideas. Expressive writing requires a student to synchronize many mental functions at once: organization, memory, attention, motor skill, and various aspects of language ability. Automatic accurate handwriting is the foundation for this juggling act. In the complexity of remembering where to put the pencil and how to form each letter, a dysgraphic student forgets what he or she meant to express. Dysgraphia can cause low classroom productivity, incomplete homework assignments, and difficulty in focusing attention.

Emotional factors arising from dysgraphia often exacerbate matters. At an early age, these students are asked to forgo recess to finish copying material from the board, and are likely to be sent home at the end of the day with a sheaf of unfinished papers to be completed. They are asked to recopy their work but the second attempt is often no better than the first. Because they are often bright and good at reading, their failure to produce acceptable work is blamed on laziness or carelessness. The resulting anger and frustration can prevent their ever reaching their true potential.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common childhood disorders and can continue through adolescence and adulthood. Symptoms include difficulty staying focused and paying attention, difficulty controlling behavior, and hyperactivity (over-activity).

Predominantly hyperactive-impulsive

Most symptoms (six or more) are in the hyperactivity-impassivity categories.

Fewer than six symptoms of inattention are present, although inattention may still be present to some degree.

Predominantly inattentive

The majority of symptoms (six or more) are in the inattention category and fewer than six symptoms of hyperactivity-impassivity are present, although hyperactivity-impassivity may still be present to some degree.

Children with this sub-type are less likely to act out or have difficulties getting along with other children. They may sit quietly, but they are not paying attention to what they are doing. Therefore, the child may be overlooked, and parents and teachers may not notice that he or she has ADHD.

Combined hyperactive-impulsive and inattentive

Six or more symptoms of inattention and six or more symptoms of hyperactivity-impulsivity are present.

Most children have the combined type of ADHD.


Refer to the following link for suggestions to help the ADHD child in class: